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As part of our collaboration with the National College for Teaching and Leadership, we have made some of our training materials available.

Resources

Videos 

Why do we need attachment aware schools?

Introduction  - A scripted piece which can be used from early years to secondary settings, showing an early years aged child/children.

Maggie Atkinson (Children's Commissioner for England) - Outlines why it is important for teachers to know about attachment issues.

Robin Balbernie (Clinical Psychologist) - Introduction to attachment theory and spectrum of needs.

Mike Gorman - Outlines why it is important for teachers to know about attachment issues.

Louise Bomber (Attachment disorder specialist) - Impact of trauma on children in schools, why schools need to be attachment aware.

Jeremy Holmes - The neuroscience of attachment (including the amygdala/frontal lobe development, mirror neurons and vagal tone). 

How do we create an attachment aware school?

Keith Ford (Primary Head Teacher) - A whole school approach - the nurturing school.

Peter Elfer - Early Years attachment and the Key Adult, including why nursery and early years settings need to be attachment aware.

Louise Bomber - Key features of an attachment aware school.

Felicia Wood (Secondary School Teacher) - The importance of consistency in the school's approach. 

Making a difference through everyday practice 

Clare Langhorn (Head teacher of Special Educational Needs school) - A whole school approach, the difference in her school when it became attachment aware for her staff and students.

Adam Crockett - The child/young person's insights (the need for attachment-like relationships).

Paul and Caroline Hicks - How parents and carers can be involved and supported.

Felicia Wood - The Key Adult/Attachment Lead.

Peter Elfer - The Key Adult approach, an overview of how it promotes attachment.

James Beattie (Play specialist) - How specialist agencies can work with schools.

Heidi Limbert (Health Visitor/Children's Centre Manager, Somer Valley) - How can partner agencies work with schools, particularly Health Visitors and Children's Centres.

Niki Smith (Senior Social Work Practitioner) - How specialist agencies can work with schools. 

Closing Summary

Why attachment makes a difference.

We would like to thank Louise Bombèr for her contribution to the opening and closing film sequences. 

Reports

Documents

Key Documents

Key Government Reports

Bibiliography

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  • Kennedy, B.L. (2008) Educating students with insecure attachment histories: toward an interdisciplinary theoretical framework. Pastoral Care in Education, 26(4), 211-230.

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